57-Hour California LCSW Pre-licensure CE Suite Text-based Course (57 CE) - Printed Version

$459.00
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SKU
1199GGSCEP

Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting CE Text-based Home Course

Almost all mental health professionals, regardless of their work settings, will at some point in their career encounter child abuse or neglect situations. By law, mental health professionals are mandated to report suspected child abuse and neglect. There is a wide range of issues pertaining to child abuse/neglect intervention, which includes identification, assessment, reporting, and treatment. For these reasons, it is critical that mental health professionals be informed about the principles and strategies helpful in these areas.

In five sections this course covers historical perspective, an overview, four types of child abuse, therapist's responses (including reporting, assessment, and therapy), and issues of countertransference.

Author: Min Hae Cho, M.S.W.

Target Audience: Introductory and Intermediate; LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Nurses, Substance Abuse Counselors, and other mental health clinicians.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify and clinically assess for the four types of child abuse: physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse and neglect.
  2. Utilize appropriate methods and skills for counseling children and their families in cases of child abuse and neglect.
  3. Identify and apply legal and ethical considerations with regard to mandated reporting duties for suspected child abuse and neglect.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge about treatment issues and specialized interventions for specific intrapersonal, interpersonal, and developmental issues associated with child abuse.
  5. Recognize countertransferential reactions with cases of child abuse and how to obtain appropriate professional guidance and support.

Human Sexuality CE Text-based Home Course

Clients often present with concerns about their sexuality, but this area may be difficult to discuss for both the therapist and the client. This curriculum provides a thorough review of historical perspectives, physical aspects of sexuality, and typical clinical issues among men and women. Definitions of sexual disorders are discussed from a psychosocial and diagnostic perspective. Issues related to sexual abuse in children and rape are discussed. This course also includes issues related to social definitions of gender (i.e., notions of masculinity and femininity) and their impact on personal identity, marriage and feminist-informed therapy. Issues pertinent to "nonconventional" forms of sex and sexual identity are also described, including issues related to the LGBT community and nonmonogamy.

Authors: Gerry Grossman, M.A., LMFT, Melanie Haro, M.A., LMFT, Kristen Hudson, M.A., LMFT, Nancy Klein, M.A., LMFT, Mary Ella Viehe, Ph.D.

Target Audience: Introductory and Intermediate; LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Nurses, Substance Abuse Counselors, and mental health clinicians.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the basic information related to male and female sexual anatomy and response.
  2. Assess and diagnose common clinical sexual problems and addiction.
  3. Identify the issues related to sexual violence for both victims and perpetrators.
  4. Integrate sociopolitical issues related gender, sexual orientation and alternative sexual practices into treatment planning.

Aging and Long-Term Care CE Text-based Home Course

As longevity and quality of life continue to improve, the population of seniors in the United States will exert increasing influence on the healthcare market, including psychological and long-term medical care services. The conditions associated with older age, such as Alzheimer’s disease and chronic illness, have become salient in healthcare provision for the elderly, and often take priority when long-term care begins.

However, often overlooked are the emotional and social challenges which elders face, which can compound the negative outcomes of their physical health. Depression, isolation, and grief, for example, are common among the elderly and can interfere with their ability to thrive with long-term illness. Very importantly too, the long-term care of elders includes caregivers, often women and family, who bear a substantial emotional burden. Their depression, conflicts and guilt can make the process and decision-making challenging, and without treatment, put them and the elders at risk. This course will discuss how therapists can assist elders and their families cope with the emotional and transitional issues associated with long-term care. Accommodations of therapy, counter-transference and assessment techniques for therapists will be addressed. Attention is also given to social issues and cultural diversity, treatment modalities including formal care, informal care and spiritual approaches, and the legal aspects of family and team-caregiving.

Authors: Tima Ivanova, M.A., LMFT, Patricia Patton-Lehn, Ph.D., Nancy Klein, M.A., LMFT

Target Audience: Introductory and Intermediate; LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Nurses, Substance Abuse Counselors, and other mental health clinicians.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify and assess the medical, emotional and social factors which impact elders’ mental health.
  2. Identify and assess the roles, pressures and challenges among informal caregivers.
  3. Implement a range of treatment modalities for elders and caregivers.
  4. Develop interventions, taking into account issues of cultural diversity, and the legal and tactical adjustments that must be made for long-term caregiving.

This presentation comprises an overview of the substance categories listed in DSM-5 to which clients may become addicted. Different models of addiction are discussed to address the complex interaction between biological, psychological and psychosocial contributors to substance abuse and addiction. Techniques for assessment and outpatient treatment are presented also.

Authors: Jeanne Obert, MSM, LMFT, Leana Gadbois, BS, Shari Gantman, MA, LMFT, Nancy Klein, MA, LMFT

Target Audience: Introductory and Intermediate; LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Nurses, Substance Abuse Counselors, and other mental health clinicians.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Integrate a range of addiction models into the assessment and treatment of substance abuse clients.
  2. Identify the basic effects, unique features, and common treatment interventions for drug categories listed in DSM-5.
  3. Practice effective substance abuse assessment techniques.
  4. Select and integrate a range of outpatient modalities to suit client needs.

Children at younger and younger ages are being prescribed medications for illnesses such as AD/HD and depression, and more and more adults are taking prescription drugs for legitimate purposes such as pain management and mood disorders. Any stigma surrounding prescription drug use is almost non-existent. As a result, the number of non-medical prescription drug users has reached epidemic levels. It is important for clinicians to understand symptoms associated with different types of prescription drugs, and also be able to accurately assess prescription drug abuse. This presentation will categorize and discuss the most commonly abused prescription drugs, as well as current beliefs regarding prescription drug abuse and the demographics most at risk for developing a prescription drug problem. This presentation will finish with treatment plans and preventative measures for prescription drub abuse.

Author: Nancy Klein, M.A., LMFT

Target Audience: Introductory and Intermediate; LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Nurses, Substance Abuse Counselors, and other mental health clinicians.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe current trends and statistics about prescription drug abuse.
  2. Distinguish between different types of prescription drugs with their uses and symptoms.
  3. Explain how prescription drugs affect different demographics.
  4. Suggest appropriate treatment options for prescription drug abusers.

This course provides a brief history of marijuana use, followed by a detailed discussion of the effects of use. The physical effects, neurological and psychological effects, short- and long-term effects, and consequences for young people's use are described. Also included is a discussion of the symptoms of Cannabis Use Disorder, Cannabis Intoxication and Cannabis Withdrawal, and some consideration of its role as a "gateway drug" and its use for medical purposes. Techniques for Assessment, treatment and the relationship of marijuana use to mood disorders details are described.

Author: Patricia Patton-Lehn, Ph.D.

Target Audience: Introductory and Intermediate; LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Nurses, Substance Abuse Counselors, and other mental health clinicians.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the physical and psychological symptoms of marijuana use.
  2. Assess and diagnose Cannabis Use Disorder, Cannabis Intoxication, and Cannabis Withdrawal.
  3. Identify treatment needs and construct a treatment plan for abuse.
  4. Assess and diagnose co-occurring mental disorders.

Methamphetamine is increasingly becoming a drug of choice for both adults and teenagers across the U.S. in cities both large and small. "Methamphetamine Abuse" provides a brief history of the drug; details the physical and psychological effects; explores the frightening face of methamphetamine abuse and dependence; and provides a full discussion of assessment and various approaches to treatment. Interspersed throughout this course are a number of compelling case studies and dozens of references and other resources.

Authors: Patricia Patton, Ph.D, Anna Treves, LCSW, Harry Hawkins III, B.A., Innokenty Chugai, B.A.

Target Audience: Introductory and Intermediate; LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Nurses, Substance Abuse Counselors, and other mental health clinicians.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Recognize physical, psychological and behavioral symptoms of methamphetamine use.
  2. Assess and diagnose Methamphetamine Use Disorder, Intoxication and Withdrawal.
  3. Integrate standard Substance Use Disorder treatment with NIDA guidelines, the Matrix outpatient treatment model, and the Haight-Ashbury outpatient treatment models.
  4. Recognize the impact of methamphetamine usage on the environment and community.

Spousal and partner abuse is most commonly understood as violence perpetrated by males against females in intimate and/or marriage relationships. Recently however, some attention has been given to gender-neutral approaches and has enhanced our understanding of the diversity of violence in a variety of partnerships: dating, homosexual, cohabitating, teen boyfriend/girlfriend, etc. This presentation will explore the barriers that therapists have, including blind spots and questioning techniques and focus upon how to make assessments for victimization and perpetration from gendered and gender-neutral perspectives. Conventional treatment considerations will be discussed, including how to devise safety plans and how to determine if individual and/or conjoint sessions are appropriate. In addition, considerations for cultural diversity are explored, to include discussion of cultural, gender-orientation, age differences in cases of domestic violence.

Authors: Sharon Law, M.A., LMFT, Patricia Patton-Lehn, Ph.D., Nancy Klein, M.A., LMFT, Jodi Blackley, MS, LMFT, Mary Ella Viehe, Ph.D., LMFT

Target Audience: Introductory and Intermediate; LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Nurses, Substance Abuse Counselors, and other mental health clinicians.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Define all types of intimate partner violence in gendered and gender-neutral perspectives.
  2. Identify the obstacles that therapists face in detecting and assessing for abuse.
  3. Identify the considerations associated with individual vs. conjoint therapy for violent partners and the best individualized approaches for safety planning and treatment decisions.
  4. List the cultural diversity factors that impact abuse assessment, disclosure and treatment.

Children exposed to domestic violence and other high conflict situations live in a perpetual state of combat readiness, ever vigilant for the next battle between their parents. The anguish and rage of these children often result in significantly impaired object relations, dissociative states, an array of high risk and self-defeating behaviors, as well as Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and severe personality disorders in adulthood. This workshop identifies the symptoms and behavioral signs that a child is being exposed to domestic violence. It explores the factors that impact how much stress a child endures as well as the developmental and neurological impacts of violence in the home. It covers assessment and diagnostic issues for PTSD, traumatic bonding and attachment dynamics, and treatment approaches that include practical cognitive-behavioral skill-building techniques (e.g. self-soothing and self-care strategies, interpersonal effectiveness and social skills), in addition to psychodynamic work and art therapy that emphasizes the therapeutic relationship and internalizing safe objects as key curative factors.

Author: Patricia Patton-Lehn, Ph.D.

Target Audience: Introductory and Intermediate; LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Nurses, Substance Abuse Counselors, and mental health clinicians.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Assess for a range of symptoms, including traumatic bonding, attachment dynamics, and PTSD.
  2. Apply Dr. Judith Herman’s model of Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder with this population.
  3. Identify environmental, developmental and neurological factors that influence the impact of violence on a child.
  4. Utilize both cognitive-behavioral skill-building techniques and psychodynamic treatment approaches.

Although most people understand domestic violence to be an act of aggression by a man against a woman, recent research has shown that males are victims of partner abuse also. Males may be subject to physical, emotional and sexual abuse, in hetero- and homosexual partnerships, and often face significant social pressures away from reporting their victimization. In this presentation, attention will be given to the unique psychological and sociological reasons that men may find themselves in abusive relationships, as well as some explanations for why they stay and why they find reporting difficult. In addition, the special treatment factors associated with detection and assessment of victimization in men is presented, as well as factors to consider when using individual or conjoint therapy. Finally, the issues for gay men in violent partnerships and the characteristics that lead women to become violent aggressors are presented.

Authors: Patricia Patton, Ph.D, Nancy Klein, MA, LMFT

Target Audience: Introductory and Intermediate; LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Nurses, Substance Abuse Counselors, and other mental health clinicians.

 

 

This course satisfies the following California BBS Pre-licensure requirements:

  • All 10 hours of Aging and Long-Term Care required for California LCSW candidates
  • All 15 hours of Alcoholism and Other Chemical Substance Dependency required for California LCSW candidates
  • All 7 hours of Child Abuse Assessment & Reporting required for California LCSW candidates
  • All 10 hours of Human Sexuality required for California LCSW candidates
  • All 15 hours of Spousal Abuse Assessment and Reporting (Domestic Violence) required for California LCSW candidates

 

Advantages of taking Gerry Grossman Seminars at-home CE courses:

  • Online courses offer the post-test online for instant course completion.
  • You can repeat the post-test if you don't pass.
  • Online courses are available to you immediately after purchase.
  • California LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs and LEPs can fulfill 100% of their CE hours online.
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