36-Hour California Complete Renewal Online Text and Video CE Suite (36 CE)

$400.00
In stock
SKU
1352GGSCE

This Continuing Education CE suite is specially designed and priced to complete all your required continuing education hours for your subsequent California MFT or LCSW license renewal. Complete all 36 hours of continuing education for licensure renewal in one place and at a substantial discount. 

Law and Ethics 2022 Online Text-Based Home Course (6 CEs)

A thorough understanding of current laws and ethical standards pertaining to psychotherapy is critical for mental health professionals. This text presents comprehensive and up-to-date information specific to recently enacted legislation as it pertains to mental health professionals in California. It also includes an overview of issues such as privilege and confidentiality, danger to self or others, treatment of minors, mandated responsibilities, telehealth, health insurance and private practice, and other legal issues related to mental health practice. Recent changes in the law are highlighted.

Author: Gerry Grossman, M.A., LMFT

Target Audience: Introductory, Intermediate, and Advanced; California LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, and LEPs.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Assess and manage legal responsibilities pertaining to both mandated and permitted exceptions.
  2. Assess and manage ethical responsibilities including dual relationships, establishing and maintaining clinical boundaries, managing countertransference, and engaging the client in the informed consent process.
  3. Maintain a standard of care to protect against charges of criminal, civil, and ethical wrongdoing.
  4. Describe how to consult to better uphold legal and ethical responsibilities.

 

Working with Suicidal Clients CE Online Text-Based Course (3 CEs)

This course will explore suicide risk that is associated with mental disorders, particular ethnic populations, and with regard to age (e.g., elders, children, adolescents and college-age adults). This presentation provides therapists techniques for developing suicide assessment protocols and treatment interventions, and in treating suicidal behaviors using a Dialectical Behavior Therapy model.

Authors: Gerry Grossman, MA, LMFT, Melanie Haro, MA, LMFT, Kristen Hudson, MA, LMFT, Nancy Klein, MA, LMFT, Chuck Moshontz, MA, LMFT, Mary Ella Viehe, Ph.D, LMFT

Target Audience: Introductory and Intermediate; LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Nurses, Substance Abuse Counselors, and other mental health clinicians.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify mental disorders commonly associated with high suicide risk.
  2. Identify cultural and age group characteristics that may increase suicide risk.
  3. Utilize suicide assessment and treatment protocols.
  4. Integrate Dialectical Behavior Therapy concepts and interventions into suicide treatment.

*This course satisfies the following California BBS Pre-licensure requirements:

  • 3 hours toward the 15 hours of Crisis or Trauma Counseling required for California LPCC candidates

 

Suicide: The Aftermath CE Online Text-Based Course (4 CEs)

Suicide is the 11th leading cause of death in the United States, and for every person who completes a suicide, there are at least six to 10 “survivors” who will grieve the consequences. Suicide can be a stigmatizing process, such that survivors may face blame and social exclusion, and may blame themselves for the death of their loved one. Their grief process may not be suited for typical grief counseling models, so therapists working with this population need to explore their own assumptions and traditional approaches to grief and loss.

Authors: Samantha Deming, MA, LMFT, Patricia Patton-Lehn, Ph.D., Aaliyah Madyun, B.A.

Target Audience: Introductory and Intermediate; LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Nurses, Substance Abuse Counselors, and other mental health clinicians.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify and assess the distinctive characteristics, and the mental and physical health risks that survivors of suicide face.
  2. Assess for “complicated grief” and adjust traditional grief counseling models to meet the unique needs of survivors.
  3. Identify the range of symptoms and treatments for suicide-bereaved children, parents, and mental health professionals.
  4. Utilize family systems techniques and postvention strategies to help survivor clients

 

7-Hour CE Child Abuse Video Course

Almost all mental health professionals, regardless of their work settings, will at some point in their career encounter child abuse or neglect situations. By law, mental health professionals are mandated to report suspected child abuse and neglect. There is a wide range of issues pertaining to child abuse/neglect intervention, which includes identification, assessment, reporting, and treatment. For these reasons, it is critical that mental health professionals be informed about the principles and strategies helpful in these areas.

This video covers historical perspectives, an overview, four types of child abuse, therapist's responses (including reporting, assessment, and therapy), and issues of countertransference.

Principal Faculty and Credentials: Pam Sirota, Psy.D., LMFT

Target Audience: LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Substance Abuse Counselors, Nurses, and Mental Health Practitioners.

Level: Introductory

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify and clinically assess for the four types of child abuse: physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse and neglect.
  2. Utilize appropriate methods and skills for counseling children and their families in cases of child abuse and neglect.
  3. Identify and apply legal and ethical considerations with regard to mandated reporting duties for suspected child abuse and neglect.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge about treatment issues and specialized interventions for specific intrapersonal, interpersonal, and developmental issues associated with child abuse.
  5. Recognize countertransferential reactions with cases of child abuse and how to obtain appropriate professional guidance and support.

This workshop integrates key concepts of mindfulness-based theory from Eastern Zen philosophy, Western Contemplative practices, Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn’s Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, as well as Dr. Marsha Linehan’s Dialectical Behavior Therapy - not simply to treat anxiety disorders, but to help clients reconstruct a non-pathologizing life narrative. Core mindfulness skills such as non-judgmental self-observation, radical acceptance, balancing emotion mind with reasonable mind, nonattachment to thoughts and feelings, meditative practices, participating in reality in the moment, and affect regulation training are addressed. Practical, clinically applicable experiential exercises and case illustrations are included.

Principal Faculty and Credentials: Andrew Teton, MA, LMFT and Patricia Patton-Lehn, Ph.D.

Target Audience: LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Substance Abuse Counselors, Nurses, and Mental Health Practitioners.

Level: Introductory

References:
Bishop, S. R., Lau, M., Shapiro, S., Carlson, L., Anderson, N., Carmody, J., … & Devins, G. (2004). Mindfulness: A proposed operational definition. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice. 11(3), 230-241.

Brown, K. & Ryan, R. (2004). The benefits of being present: Mindfulness and its role in psychological well-being. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 84(4), 822-848.

Hayes, S.C. & Feldman, G. (2004). Clarifying the construct of mindfulness in the context of emotion regulation and the process of change in therapy. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice. 11(3), 255-262.

Robins, Clive J. (2002). Zen principles and mindfulness practice in dialectical behavior therapy. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice. 9(9), 50.

Zettle, R. D. (2005). The evolution of a contextual approach to therapy: From comprehensive distancing to ACT. International Journal of Behavioral Consultation and Therapy. 1(2), 77-89.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify historical antecedents and a clinical definition of core mindfulness, as well as its application in psychotherapy.
  2. Apply Dialectical Behavior Therapy’s (DBT) Core Mindfulness Skills to the treatment of anxiety.
  3. Utilize the various therapeutic applications of Jon Kabat-Zinn’s Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) Program in relation to treat anxiety.
  4. Integrate treatment strategies from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Mindfulness to treat Anxiety Disorders.
  5. Understand treatment models for Panic Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, PTSD, and child and adolescent anxiety disorders.

• The nature and prevalence of depression
• DSM-5 criteria for Bipolar-Related Disorders and Depressive Disorders
• The manifestation of depressive symptoms in men and women
• Depression assessment techniques
• The effect of behavior and thinking on depression
• Cognitive-behavioral treatment of depression
• Client treatment non-compliance
• A problem-solving approach to depression
• Depression and insomnia
• Adolescent depression and treatment

Methodology:

• Video with accompanying powerpoint and handouts
• Focus questions and rationales follow video sections to highlight and enhance the retention of information.
• Vignettes are utilized for class discussion and application of the presented concepts.

Principal Faculty and Credentials: Pam Sirota, Psy.D., LMFT

Target Audience: LMFTs, Social Workers, LPCCs, Substance Abuse Counselors, Nurses, and Mental Health Practitioners.

Level: Introductory

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Differentiate between Seasonal Affective Disorder, Bipolar Depression, Chronic Depression and other depressive. disorders.
  2. Analyze the causes of depression with a special emphasis on exogenous and endogenous factors.
  3. Compare three evidence-based treatment modalities recommended for clients diagnosed with depressive disorders.
  4. Utilize five simple interventions to treat clients exhibiting depressive symptoms.
  5. Summarize some of the consequences of untreated depression including the dangers of depression co-occurring with drug and/or alcohol abuse.

With this video course, students will obtain an online education on DSM-5. The course consists of 18 segments with each segment followed by a focus quiz to demonstrate student understanding. Each segment consists of 10-20 minutes of instruction on several of the classifications of the DSM-5. The course includes a printable file of 26 DSM-5 classification charts for use during the video and in clinical practice. Rocio ("Cio) Hernandez, LMFT, LPCC, uses her engaging teaching style and broad field experience to provide timely and culturally relevant ways to use DSM-5.


Principal Faculty and Credentials: Gerry Grossman, MA, LMFT, Nancy Klein, MA, LMFT, and Rocio Elisa Hernandez, MS, LMFT, LPCC

References:
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.
American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed., text rev.). Washington, DC: Author.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. List DSM-5 new diagnoses, new diagnostic criteria, and classifications.
  2. Identify how previous diagnoses have been renamed, revised and reclassified in the DSM-5.
  3. Apply their understanding of the DSM-5 to assessments and diagnosis in complex psychosocial contexts.
  4. Explain the cultural, theoretical and practical implications of the diagnostic revisions and additions.

Emotional resiliency became a growing topic of research in the aftermath of disasters such as 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, and economic crises. As with almost any type of behavior, resiliency can be learned to help people rebound quickly and more efficiently from any traumatic situation. Resiliency also incorporates recruiting outside resources for support. People who practice resiliency skills are better able to convert experiences of hardships into experiences of increased empowerment, inner strength, and personal meaning. This course defines emotional resilience and differentiates it from survival skills. It identifies many of the core qualities and attitudes of resiliency, and explores specific goals and interventions that help to develop characteristics associated with resiliency. Mindfulness principles that promote resiliency will be discussed.

Principal Faculty and Credentials: Patricia Patton-Lehn, Ph.D.

References:
Denny, S., Clark, T.C., Fleming, T., Wall, M. Emotional resilience: risk and protective factors for depression among alternative education students in New Zealand. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry (2004). 74(2):137-149.
Hammond, C. (2004). Impacts of lifelong learning upon emotional resilience, psychological and mental health: fieldwork evidence. Oxford Review of Education. 30(4):551-568
Mayer, J. & Salovey, P. (1989). “Emotional Intelligence,” Imagination, Cognition, and Personality 9, 185-211.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Define the concept of emotional resilience and distinguish it from survival skills.
  2. Identify the underlying qualities and attitudes that develop resilience.
  3. Explore specific goals and interventions that cultivate many of the major characteristics of resilience.
  4. Apply mindfulness techniques to increase resiliency in every day life situations.
 

Please note:

  • Video courses are filmed at live GGS classes and separated into segments of 30 minutes or less.
  • Online courses offer the post-test online for instant course completion.
  • You can repeat the post-test if you don't pass.
  • Online courses are available to you immediately after purchase.
  • California LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs and LEPs can fulfill 100% of their CE hours online.
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